Anyone who has stopped in for a visit to Noyes Flower & Plant Shoppe in the past 40 years, was likely greeted with a warm hello and, if lucky, a story from our father, Kimber Noyes.

Recently, we were lucky enough to chat with Kimber about what it was like growing up on a potato farm in Caribou Maine in the 1950s and 1960s.

Our conversation centered mostly on Kimber’s memories of working the farm before going to college. We will have another conversation at a later date that covers more about the 40 successful years he and my mother Cindy have owned Noyes Flower & Plant Shoppe. Our conversation spanned topics that included memories of rogue tractor adventures, Kimber’s first business (spoiler: he was age 5), and many feats of farm strength (and not just of the physical nature).

Our father is one of the best storytellers we know.  We truly hope you enjoy our podcast.  If you missed our first episode with our amazing grandmother Pam Mooers, you can have a listen here: www.gromaine.com/themaineideapodcast01

Links and Pictures Associated with this Podcast: 

Interested in our incredible music? Look no further…

 

https://middlemountain.bandcamp.com/album/by-way-of-2
https://www.facebook.com/middlemountainmusic

This autumn, be sure to check out WAGM Presque Isle’s 55 Annual  Potato Pickers Special.  In the meantime, you can appease your potato ponderings here:

http://wagmtv.com/potato-pickers-special-10-06-2014/

As promised, feel free to visit the Maine Memory Network for an image of a 2 row potato digger:

https://www.mainememory.net/artifact/11681/enlarge

 

in front of house

My grandfather Clayton & grandmother Ruth in front of their house, a home built by Clayton. He dug the basement by hand!

barn

Our grandfather Clayton with our uncle Paul in front of the barn. This the same barn that would later burn, as described by our father Kimber in our podcast

 

fordson

Clayton driving one of the old Fordson tractors that Kimber speaks about

Mrs. B

Mrs. Beaulieu with 2 potato barrels. These are the same type of cedar tongue-&-groove that we still use at the South Portland Farmer’s Market

 

hay

When Kimber talks about “building the load” when haying, this is what he means…